South China Sea E-Forum

South China Sea E-Forum (http://www.unepscs.org/forum/index.php)
-   Seagrass (http://www.unepscs.org/forumhttp://www.unepscs.org/forum/f-seagrass-8.html)
-   -   Seagrass Inputs to the Regional Strategic Action Programme (http://www.unepscs.org/forumhttp://www.unepscs.org/forum/f-seagrass-8/t-seagrass-inputs-to-the-regional-strategic-action-programme-5-print.html/)

Chris Paterson 12-11-06 10:18

Seagrass Inputs to the Regional Strategic Action Programme
 
The Regional Working Group on Seagrass agreed during its Seventh Meeting in Beihai, China (19-21 June) that they would establish an e-forum on UNEPSCS.org to facilitate the development of seagrass sub-component inputs to the regional Strategic Action Programme. Each member of the RWG-SG has been subscribed to this e-forum and will be notified as soon as a new message is posted in here.

Chris :)

Miguel Fortes 12-11-06 11:02

COMPONENT 1

Component 1: Research and Monitoring

1.1.1. Enhance assessment of baseline information on seagrass from deeper waters and other unstudied areas

Background – A conservative estimate is that 90% of the knowledge the region has on its seagrasses –their taxonomy, structure and dynamics- comes almost solely from plants at the upper 3 meters of the coastal waters of the South China Sea and surrounding seas. But sporadic collections and dives at depths greater than 5 meters (or dredge materials from oceanographic cruises) have shown that seagrass communities still thrive at these and at greater depths. In addition, the five member countries have so far subjected only 28 sites to intensive study, leaving a substantial number of sites with seagrass practically untouched. More recently, using Landsat Thematic Mapper Multispectral data (Landsat TM, 30 m higher resolution) acquired in January 2005, the Philippine Component has identified 529 major seagrass sites along the South China Sea coast, i.e. sites with at least 1 sq km of seagrass, were identified.

There is a need to enhance the assessment and monitoring of the seagrass communities at waters below 5 m depths and at both shallow and deeper waters in areas so far unstudied (e.g. adjacent study sites). The results of these studies will augment existing knowledge and provide us with a true baseline for detecting and monitoring changes resulting from intensified natural events and man-induced disturbances. They will be a contribution to our knowledge of our seagrass resources, solidifying their roles in the carbon budget of the South China Sea, coastal and marine biodiversity, and in the improvement of the quality of lives of people.

Approach –The sites for assessment and monitoring at depths will be selected based on previous knowledge and set criteria arrived at the national level. The main objective is to know what species of seagrasses exist, how they are distributed (temporally and spatially), and what environmental factors affect their distribution. Where regional cooperative venture is considered, this will in consultation with the other participating countries. SCUBA will be the normal gear used. At the shallow unstudied sites, selection will be at the discretion of the country focal points, but the use of high resolution remotely sensed data from the project is highly recommended. Once the sites have been selected, the SeagrassNet and/or SeagrassWatch protocols for assessment and monitoring (see below) may be used.

Indicative budget – US$ 55,000

1.1.2. Adopt and implement a regional seagrass resource assessment and monitoring protocol (e.g. SeagrassNet and SeagrassWatch)

Background – The SeagrassNet and/or SeagrassWatch protocols will be adopted and implemented at identified study sites. These are sites where more detailed information about the resources, environmental parameters and degree of perturbation will be gathered. SeagrassNet (www.SeagrassNet.org) is a scientific global monitoring program to investigate and document both the status of seagrass resources worldwide and the threats to this marine ecosystem. The program started in 2001 in the Western Pacific and now includes 28 sites in 15 countries; a globally applicable monitoring protocol and web-based data reporting system have been established. SeagrassWatch is the largest scientific, community-based non-destructive, seagrass assessment and monitoring program in the world being implemented at present in 165 sites all over the world (http://www.seagrasswatch.org).

Approach – Utilizing the expertise of the developers of the protocols themselves, initial workshops and hands-on exercises will be conducted prior the actual assessment and monitoring activities. SeagrassNet teams are mainly composed of scientists from participating countries, while those of SeagrassWatch are largely non-scientists. Both teams conduct synchronous and repeated sampling of selected plant parameters (density, cover, height, and associated fauna) and environmental forcing factors ((water temperature, light, salinity, and sediment) to determine seagrass status and trends. They collect information with the goal of elevating interest and awareness in seagrasses and providing a “global report card” on the health of the valuable seagrass habitat. An assessment and monitoring kit is available to all participating countries.

Indicative Budget – US$35,000

1.4.1. Assemble information and data relating to seagrass habitats into a regional seagrass database

Background – Since the late 1980’s, coastal scientists and students have been collecting specimens of seagrasses and other flora and fauna associated with them. These materials and information, however, are not systematically catalogued. In a few institutions where these materials are inventoried, the institutions are ill equipped to maintain the collections for lack of funds for personnel. An urgent need is felt to systematically catalogue all existing seagrass specimens and seagrass habitat information available from scientific and research institutions in the region.

The Marine Science Institute CS of the University of the Philippines (UPMSI) has been designated by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) to be the repository of marine plants of Southeast and East Asia. It has sizable collections of seaweeds and seagrasses, accumulated from collections and materials used in training courses involving the same scientists as in the UNEP/GEF SCS Project. The advantage of having such a systematic regional Marine Plant Repository is obvious: the region would have a database of specimens and information on seagrass resources, useful for instructions, for public awareness, and as natural resource materials for posterity.

Approach – Initially through the e-forum of the UNEP/GEF SCS Project and the Seagrass Information Network for East Asia (SINEA), the UPMSI will initiate contacts with academic and research institutions in the region dealing with seagrasses. Among others the information to be sent out will include: what seagrasses are available, where these are available, where collected, when and who collected them, other information on the habitat, proprietary rights, etc. Specimen and information exchange will be encouraged among the members of the network. Contributing partners will be provided duplicates of all the materials and information. Initially, access will be facilitated electronically.

To sustain this initiative, the specimens and information will be a regular instruction and training aids at the training courses of the project and related activities at the institutions concerned. Two full-time personnel (curator and an assistant) will be hired to maintain the collections. Other sources of support will be tapped.

Indicative Budget – US$42,000

1.4.2 Expand and up-date the regional seagrass meta-database

Background – As reported by the PCU, there are currently in excess of one hundred institutions directly involved in the seagrass component of the project. It is anticipated that this network will continue to grow, with a wide range of outputs, as the demonstration sites and pilot activities become fully operational. At present, the South China Sea Meta-Database contained more than 1,000 metadata entries, but the quality of some of the entries is in question. In addition, there is a need to expand and update it in view of the expected growth in the network. As agreed upon at the RWG-SG-7, there is a need to critically evaluate the meta-data quality and agreed to revise and add new meta-data to the online meta-database by the end of September 2006.

It should be emphasized that there are metadata entries on seagrass, which are available from institutions in the region. These are largely the outcome of collaborative projects the same member countries had in the past 10 or 15 years. The problem is the absence of dedicated personnel to take care of the proper entry, due in large measure to shifts in responsibilities in the concerned institutions or agencies.

Approach – Working on the existing metadata on seagrass, and utilizing the website of the project, the data will be improved in quality and at the same time more data entries will be inputted into the structure. The procedures for these activities are well laid out in the materials (e.g. CD) distributed by the PCU.

Indicative Budget - This is an approved activity of the project with initial funding for its completion. Hence, this will incur no other costs.

Component 5: Resource and Habitat Management

5.3.1 Undertake a regional synthesis of and pilot appropriate techniques for rehabilitating seagrass

Background - While the science and technology for seagrass rehabilitation is well established in the more developed countries (e.g. USA, Australia, and Japan), these are virtually unheard of in the Seas of East Asia. Earlier attempts have been made to rehabilitate degraded coastal areas through use of artificial seagrasses (see Fortes 1995), but this initiative was discontinued simply because of its ‘impracticality’, e.g. why embark on using artificial seagrass for rehabilitation when there are so many naturally growing seagrasses in the region? In addition, the usefulness of the ‘technology’ is not yet unequivocally confirmed in this part of the world.

On the other hand, there are areas, which have been degraded especially my human’s modification of coasts, e.g. mine tailings area, coastal areas left derelict by tourism establishments or fishpond construction. Although an isolated case, the copper mine tailings area in Marinduque Bay, Philippines, some of the coastal ecosystem components (e.g. seagrasses, fish, invertebrates, seaweeds, organic sediments, clearer water) were successfully ‘restored’ using artificial seagrasses and artificial reefs. There is thus a potential for seagrass rehabilitation through use of transplants and artificial seagrasses. It should be emphasized, however, that this has to be well discussed with experts before its implementation.

A number of techniques are available for use in seagrass rehabilitation, e.g. use of sprigs, seeds, young shoots. So far, depending on the succession stage of the communities, seeds have shown the greatest promise. Considering the extent of degradation of Southeast Asian coasts, it is worthwhile considering the use of this ‘technology’ to improve the conditions. The initial step towards this direction is a regional synthesis of the information. In some parts especially of the Seagrass Demonstration Sites, which may need rehabilitation, the technique could be piloted.

Approach – A part of the seagrass metadata and other existing sources, information on seagrass rehabilitation will be culled out, synthesized, and critically analyzed for possible application. The preferred pilot sites would be portions of the established demonstration sites, if these exist. Otherwise, any other sites, which meet, agreed criteria could be useful. For sustainability, this portion of the project should be made an integral part of community activities along coasts (much like mangrove transplantation), training courses, or their ‘successes’ disseminated for use by concerned industries (e.g. tourism, mining). Hence, an intensive awareness and promotional activity should precede its implementation.

Indicative Budget - US$65,000

5.7.1. Synthesis of ‘successes’ in alternative or complementary livelihood programmes using seagrass resources

Background - Compared to coral reefs and mangroves, seagrasses have very few ‘successes’ in terms of their use as alternative or complementary sources of income. This is because the usefulness of seagrasses resides mostly in their ecological roles, not much in their economic roles. But information both inside and outside the region is accumulating pointing the high potential of seagrasses as viable sources of additional income for fishermen and coastal entrepreneurs e.g. seeds and leaves of some species are edible as salad, leaves of the bigger species as materials in the manufacture of handbags, mats, seagrasses as tourist attractions, etc. While still at the experimental stage, the initiative made at the UPMSI has demonstrated that flour from the seeds of Enhalus acoroides could be used in baking cookies, not to mention the potential pharmaceutical or industrial use of some chemical compounds found in some seagrass species (e.g. phenols). The highly sought after Omega-3 is found in some organisms associated closely with seagrasses.

Approach – An intensive search for the use of seagrass and its associated resources will be made, initially utilizing existing project network. This will be expanded to include other sources (e.g. Seagrass Forum) inside and outside the region. The information gathered will be validated, documented and synthesized. The result will be compared to existing related information on mangroves and coral reef resources for integration purposes. Information on income derived, duration of seagrass-related livelihood activities, manpower requirement, etc. will likewise be gathered.

The information gathered will be used in training courses and academic instructions especially at local institutions. Coordination with SINEA, intensive use of the project website and e-forum will greatly facilitate the acquisition of the needed information. The active role of the local communities will be indispensable in the completion of this activity.

Indicative Budget - US$22,000

5.8.1. Promote transboundary management and zoning of seagrass for conservation of marine endangered species (e.g. sea turtles and dugongs)

Background – More than 500 MPAs or similar areas for protection exist in the region. Unfortunately, not a single area has been reserved solely for seagrass protection. This is the primary reason why the Seagrass Component of the project targets the establishment of Seagrass Marine Protected Areas.

Much less initiative exists regarding transboundary management and zoning of seagrass for the conservation of marine endangered species dependent upon the habitats (e.g. dugong and sea turtles). Although transboundary management of the migration route of sea turtles exists between Malaysia and the Philippines, the seagrass areas within the management jurisdiction are not well defined. There is a need to delineate these areas and zone them for jurisdictional purposes. This initiative will be useful in a regional understanding of the behaviour of these endangered species, at the same time, building ‘confidence’ among governments in areas where this is needed to effect cooperation.

Approach - In close collaboration with organizations and agencies working on these animals, (e.g. UNEP, WWF, IUCN, CI, national conservation institutions) this part of the project will intensify the promotion of the concept through workshops and on-site activities, especially in Indonesia, Vietnam, China, Malaysia and the Philippines.

Indicative Budget - US$55,000
:)

Xiaoping Huang 12-11-06 11:24

Component 1: Research and Monitoring

1.3 Socio-economic and Cultural Assessment

1.3.1. Analysis of regional socio-economic and cultural aspects of seagrass (e.g. as input for Eco. valuation)

One of the bases of economic valuation of the South China Sea Project is that deep analysis of seagrass service functions for socio-economic and culture should be taken, including consideration of socio-eco valuation for seagrass. At least two workshops for the analysis of regional socio-economic and cultural aspects of seagrass should be conducted within the next 5 years.

1.3.2. Develop regional guidelines on socio-economic and cultural assessment related to seagrass

Assemble the research results of socio-economic and cultural assessment on seagrass and out standing scientists of socio-economic and cultural assessment for marine ecology, regional guidelines on socio-economic and cultural assessment related to seagrass should be developed. Two workshops should be held to discuss the draft of the regional guidelines. The final version of guidelines should be widely distributed in the region. Then two training courses should be taken for the guideline users.

Component 5: Resource and Habitat Management

5.8 Establishment of Management Zones

5.8.2. Establish a regional body for joint management of seagrass resources

Under the management framework of UNEP and the South China Sea Project, establish a regional body for joint management of seagrass resources. It should include National Focal Points, National Technical Points, National Seagrass sub-component Focal Points, and Mayors and Site Managers of seagrass demonstration Sites from 7 countries bordering the South China South and Gulf of Thailand. The regional body should hold annual meeting in order to discuss the regional situation and actions relating to seagrass resource management.

5.8.3 Establish seagrass habitat corridors

Based on the seagrass demonstration sites of the South China Sea Project, seagrass habitat corridors should be established in the each country of the South China Sea region. The habitat corridors could be National Reserve, Marine Park Area, or Fish Sanctuary, National Park etc. The added area by the year 2012 should be more than 4,590ha.
:)

Hutomo Malikusworo 12-11-06 11:25

Component 2: National Policy, Legal and Institutional Arrangement and Co-ordination

Objectives:
  • To codify and harmonize existing policies and legislation
    To ensure cross sectoral and participatory approaches to address threats of the root causes
    To assist countries in meeting their obligations under multilateral environmental agreement

2.1 Integration of Research Program with Management and Policy Making


2.1.1. Organize and develop the process of integration of research program with policy

Description of activities:
  • Organize regional workshop by inviting scientists, resource managers and policy makers from regional to discuss the role of researches in developing management plan
    Presentation by scientists on topics of how the results of researches/studies on resources assessment as well as on socio-economic assessment to be used as basis to develop proposed activities to manage and sustainable use of seagrass resources
    Discuss develop and agree on a draft paper on the process of integration of research program with policy making

2.1.2. Develop guidelines or procedures to integrate research into management and policy making

Description of activities:
  • Organize regional workshop by inviting scientists, resource managers and policy makers and ask them to present papers on their experiences in integrating research into management and policy making
    Discuss how to make use of the results of presentation as input in developing guidelines or procedures to integrate research into management and policy making
    Assign group of experts selected among participants to prepare draft guideline. The draft guideline distributed to all participants to invite comments and input
    Finalize draft guideline based on comments and input, final editing and printing
    Dissemination of the printed guideline

2.1.3. Integration of assessments results into local management plan

Description of activities:

  • Organize regional workshop by inviting scientists, resource managers and decision makers to present their experiences on integrating assessment results (resource, socio-economic, legal and institutional) into local (seagrass) management plan
    Discuss how to make use of the presentations in developing process and procedure to integrate assessment results into local (seagrass) management plan.
    To assign a group of experts selected among participants to draft process and procedure to integrate assessment results into local management plan
    Distribute the draft of process and procedures to all participants to invite comments and input
    Finalize draft of process and procedure by considering the comments and input from other participants
    Editing, printing and disseminating the process and procedure

2.2: Monitoring the implementation of NAPs

2.2.1 Maintain and enhance the existing network of regional working group for seagrass

Description of Activities:
  • Conduct a regional meeting discussing the way and mechanism to maintain and enhance the existing network of regional working group for seagrass as a tool to monitor the implementation of NAPs
    Prepare and adopt the draft of mechanism
    Implement the agreed mechanism to maintain and enhance the existing network to be used in monitoring the implementation of NAPs
:)

Kim Sour 12-11-06 11:27

Component 2

Component 2: National Policy, Legal and Institutional Arrangement and Co-ordination

2.2 Monitoring the Implementation of NAPs

2.2.1. Maintain and Enhance the Existing Network of Regional Working Group on Seagrass

The South China Sea Project will complete its mandate by 2007; and in order to sustainably maintain the network of seagrass in the region, it is imperative to have the current existing Regional Working Group on Seagrass (RWG-SG) be maintained and functional by having regular annual meeting. The member or the Focal Point from each country would play extremely a crucial role in monitoring the implementation of the National Action Plan for seagrass management and conservation when the plan is approved by the national government of each country. At the meeting each year, members will report results/outputs of the NAP implementation; and at the same time issues/problems will be raised for discussion at the meeting.

At national level, each member will maintain the relationship with concerned national institutions and local coastal government agencies for maintaining the network of seagrass by having regularly annual national committee meeting.

2.3 Strengthening Traditional Value into Management System

2.3.1. Compile Ethnobotanical and Traditional Practices and Management of Seagrass considering their application in the Modern Context

Historically, each country in the region must have ethnobotanical and traditional practices and management of seagrass ecosystem and conservation of endangered species such as sea turtles, dugong and dolphins. Good practices of associated seagrass vegetable in the region for traditional medicine, herbs, food, etc., will be compiled as regionally single document for the use of local people in all seven countries. Similarly, legends and religious advices regarding the management and conservation of seagrass and associated species will be brought by members of the RWG-SG to the annual meeting for compiling into a regional document of practices. The regional documents of good practices for seagrass management and conservation of endangered species will be translated into deferent national languages for distribution.

2.4. Establish an Incentive System

2.4.1. Development of Criteria and Award System for Exemplary Seagrass Related Projects

In order to enhance the management and awareness of seagrass ecosystem in the region, an incentive system is indispensable tool. In each year, three best seagrass related projects in the region will be put into consideration by members of the RWG-SG in order to provide a prize or a trophy. An amount budget will be allocated for prizes of the three wining projects in each year. This selection will be carried out based on the criteria developed by the Regional Working Group on Seagrass at the beginning of the SAP implementation during the course of its annual meeting.

To publicise the award system, in each country a national workshop will be conducted by participation of relevant stakeholders from all levels, especially local and community level, in order to discuss the criteria and be aware the award system for good practices of seagrass related projects.

2.6. International and Regional Co-operation

2.6.1. Participation in the International Associations and Network related to seagrass

In order to enhance the international and regional co-operation, representatives of the existing seagrass network (or members of the RWG-SG) will participate in an internationally organised symposium, conference, workshop, and/or a meeting. Members will present to the meeting the outputs of activities implemented since the beginning of the SCS project. On the other hand, lessons learnt from other seagrass related projects/activities of other places will be brought and shared with the rest of members and related institutions in the South China Sea and Gulf of Thailand.
:cool:

Marco Nemesio E. Montano 12-11-06 11:28

Component 3: Publication, Awareness and Education

3.2. Development, improvement of awareness materials

3.2.1 Establish regional award system for seagrass awareness/research/ management

Description:
  • The establishment of a regional award for seagrass awareness management will bring attention to the general public the importance of seagrass ecosystem and its connectivity with other marine ecosystem. It is envisioned that the RWG-SG set the criteria and will initially comprise
    the board of judges. The award system may be collaborated with the regional environmental groups and the international groups to gain mileage.

3.2.2 Compile, select, produce and disseminate awareness materials of seagrass through media/website

Description:

The target of such activity is to provide information to regional environmental organization and media to help in their advocacy to promote the sustainable utilization of the seagrass in the region. The activity may need translation of scientific knowledge to layman term.
:)

Ouk Vibol 12-11-06 11:29

Component 3: Publication, Awareness and Education

3.1. Improve Government services/Education

3.1.1. Build partnership through personal exchange, especially among demonstration site through site visit, meeting etc.

Description:
The Technical Scientific Conference as done in November 2005 and Round Table Meeting among local government and site manager done in June 2006 is the best way to share the experiences gained from different demo-site. SCS should continue these actions. The plan should be done every twice years at the best demo-site.

3.1.1. Formulate the regional seagrass awareness syllabuses for formal education

Description:
Integration of seagrass topic into curriculum is the best way to strengthen awareness on seagrass. During the PSC or RSTC meeting SCS should raise this issue to member and discuss how to formulate it. In the RWG-SG this issue can also be raised.
:cool:

Suvaluck Satumanatpan 12-11-06 11:31

Component 4: Capacity Building and Sustainability

Background

The Capacity Building and Sustainability is one of the five key components of the National Action Plan agreed during the 6th Meeting of the RWG-SG held in Bolinao, Philippines from 27 – 30 September 2005. During that meeting, the proposed regional activities under the above component were found varied where the following eight sub-components were identified:
• Human Resource Development
• Immediate Training Activities
• Law Enforcement
• Monitoring, Controlling and Surveillance
• Financial Sustainability
• Infrastructure Development
• Institutional Building and Strengthening
• Network Establishment and Strengthening

This component remains to be an important element for the Regional Strategic Action Programme (SAP) as concluded during the 7th Meeting of the RWG-SG held in Beihai, China from 24 – 28 July 2006.

During the 7th Meeting of the RWG-SG recently held in Beihai, China, 24-28 July 2006, the sub-committee (Yom and Din) essentially considered the component of Capacity Building and Sustainability to remain as an important element for the formation of Regional Strategic Action Programme (SAP). However, the sub-component was trimmed down to only three as some similar activities are merged into one same heading. Below are the agreed sub-components:
• Human Resource Development
• Financial Sustainability and Institutional Strengthening
• Network Establishment and Strengthening

Objectives

To strengthen the capacity for sustainable seagrass management and conservation.

Sub-component

4.1 Human Resource Development


Training on the human resource development aims to improve knowledge and skills of individuals that involve in seagrass conservation and management. It covers both short and long term trainings. The short term training is the one organised for a short period of time, normally within 1-2 weeks. During the 7th Meeting of RWG-SG held from 24 – 28 July 2006 in Beihai, China, the following is a list if activities agreed by all members:
• Seagrass resource assessment and monitoring,
• Resource management models (e.g., marine parks, marine protected areas, fisheries refugia, community-based management),
• Socio-economic aspects of seagrass management (economic valuation, cost revenue analysis, socio-cultural assessment),
• Habitat rehabilitation (transplantation, restoration and artificial seagrass),
• Supplemental income generation (e.g., invertebrate and seaweed culture, sea ranching, eco-tourism development and ethnobotanical study,
• Social marketing and information, education and communication (IEC) initiatives (print, radio, TV),
• Institutional arrangement and management framework (policies & guidelines, local and national legislation and EIA),
• Incorporate threat evaluation as part of management framework formulation,
• Paralegal issues, stakeholder analysis, community empowerment and participatory approach,
• GIS and remote sensing and
• Community-based management.

The long term training is referred to the one organised for a longer period, normally between six months to 2 years, leading to a diploma or post-graduate degree certification. It involves the provision of scholarships to young scientists to gain knowledge and experience in broader disciplines but closely associated with seagrass such as in the field of biology, ecology, conservation, socio-economy etc.

4.2 Financial Sustainability and Institutional Strengthening

Sustainability and success of the capacity building and the overall implementation of seagrass project are very much dependence on the availability of funds and close cooperation between the implementing agencies and the other support organisations and institutions. The activities include:
• Establish a Seagrass Trust Fund
• Strengthening and expanding regional collaboration

4.3 Network Establishment and Strengthening

Managing environmental issue will become more effective through collective responsibility. Hence, establishing networking and strengthening it are very crucial. The activities include:

• Organise annual/regional conference and symposium
• Upgrade UNEP-GEF website
• Periodical publication
:)

Nguyen Van Tien 12-11-06 11:32

Component 5. Resource and Habitat Management

5.4.1. Develop guidelines based on regional synthesis of experiences in community-based seagrass management

1. Rationale
In recent years, it was obvious that, success of coastal resource management in some localities in the region was mainly based on new management approach: decentralization of authority. This type of management approaches was defined as “community-based management”. This is different with the previous management system, where all decisions done by local administration only. The major purposes of some regional seagrass demonstration site were “community-based management” (Kampot-Cambodia; Hepu, Liusa-China; Bintan-Indonesia; Puerto-Galara-Philippines; Patani-Thailand, Thuy Trieu-Viet Nam). The regional review and synthesis of experiences in community-based seagrass management from these demonstration sites and from the other ones in the form of guideline are very indispensable. The guideline after intensively discussion, revision and refinement should disseminate to the region for common use.

2. Preliminary content of guideline

The guideline includes some elements following:

2.1 Synthesis of regional community experiences of empowerment in seagrass resource management. Review of community participation of multi-sectoral stakeholders to ensure high consensus in seagrass resource management. This also includes synthesis of regional experiences on increasing support of local government and creating volunteer network in seagrass resource management.
2.2 Synthesis of regional community experiences on stakeholders’ equity in seagrass resource management. Local seagrass resource users are allowed freely participate in decision making in seagrass management and are equitable represented in local leadership. This also includes gender equity.
2.3 Synthesis of regional experiences on solving user’s conflicts with seagrass beds.
2.4 Synthesis of regional community experiences on local and traditional knowledge and resource patrolling/monitoring.
2.5 Synthesis of community experiences on exploitation, utilization, protection and rehabilitation of seagrass resource.
2.6 Synthesis of regional community experiences on protecting rare, precious and threatened species in seagrass beds.
2.7 Synthesis of community experiences on livelihood alternatives
2.8 Synthesis of community experiences on finance sustainability and revenue in community-based seagrass management.

3. Implementation measures

3.1 Regional network: It is expectative that members of the current existing regional working group on seagrass to bear the responsibility for collectively developing guideline. It is necessary to assign experts to prepare the draft guideline.
3.2 National meeting: National seagrass focal points are responsible to organize the meeting to get information, data on good experiences in community-based seagrass management
3.3 Regional meeting: National seagrass focal points, demonstration site managers or their alternates will gather information, data and bring them to the meeting for discussion, amendment and improvement
3.4 Use of website: All comments, information-share and exchange of viewpoints to carry out through webpage of the UNEP/GEF/SCS project in sub-component e-forum.
3.5 Funds: Funds need to be available to support national and regional networking meetings and travels on official business (details to add in the next stage).
5.6.1. Replicate successful models for conservation and management of seagrass for use in region

1. Rationale
In recent years, there are some effective models of marine and coastal resource management established, such as marine parks (government), marine protected areas (government), community-based management (indigenous peoples, local communities), co-management (collaborative, transboundary, demonstration sites, joint management) and private management (individual or corporate land owners, NGO, indigenous peoples). It is imperative to review and synthesise these management models with satisfactory results in order to replicate for common use in the region. The majority of the existing models aim at to manage coastal resources, including seagrass. This sub-component will focus mainly on models of seagrass management.

2. Implementation measures
2.1 Regional network: It is hopeful that managers from seagrass demonstration sites, marine protected areas, marine parks, representatives of communities, members of the current existing regional working group on seagrass and some relevant scientists will take part in the network.
2.2 National meeting: National seagrass focal points are responsible to organize the meeting to get information, data on effective management models of seagrass.
2.3 Regional meeting: Members of regional network established to take part in annual regional meetings. They will bring information and data to the meeting for discussion and improvement. Assignment of experts to synthesise the documents are necessary.
2.4 Use of website: All comments, information-share and exchange of viewpoints to carry out through webpage of the UNEP/GEF/SCS project in sub-component e-forum.
2.5 Funds: Funds need to be available to support national and regional networking meetings and travels on official business (details to add in the next stage).
:)

Kim Sour 12-11-06 11:33

Sub-component 2.5 : Linkage to regional and international obligations

Regional Activity 2.5.1 Analysis of outcomes of projects to enhance compliances to treaties, conventions and agreements

Description of activities:
• Conduct a regional workshop by inviting demosite managers, focal points and regional experts to presents their project outcomes, analyze the outcomes and discuss their compliances to treaties, conventions and agreements
• Discuss the way to enhance compliances of the project outcomes to treaties , conventions and agreements
• Agree on the way to enhance compliances of the project outcomes to treaties, conventions and agrements
:rolleyes:


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